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The squid fishery in New Zealand, the role of joint ventures and foreign fleets: Renewable resource in the Pacific

por Wallace, C.C; English, H.E; Scott, A; IDRC, Ottawa (Canadá); 12. Pacific Trade and Development Conference Vancouver (Canadá) 7-11 Set 1981.
Tipo de material: materialTypeLabelLivroNúmero de Chamada: INVES-ET P01 E58 Série: IDRC (Canadá) no. 181e. Lugar de publicação: Ottawa (Canadá): 1982Descrição: p. 178-187.ISBN: 0-88936-312-9.Resumo: The catching capacity of the New Zealand fishing industry has grown rapidly since the mid-1960s. New Zealand's declaration of its exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in 1978 forced resource managers in the country to parcel out the fisheries resources among competing claimants: the domestic, joint-venture, and foreign fleets. Export incentives applied by the New Zealand government to the operations of the joint-venture companies dominated their performance results and were highly discriminatory. The policiy changes to the basis of the application of these incentives altered results significantly and were well directed. The licenced foreign fleet's operations contribute more in direct benefits than do joint ventures, but the comparison is exceedingly sensitive to the institutional framework that governs the operations of the joint ventures. The research is still in progressAssunto(s): CALAMAR | PESCA | DESARROLLO PESQUERO | DERECHOS DE PESCA | POLITICA PESQUERA | ACUERDOS COMERCIALES | NUEVA ZELANDIA
Tipo de material Localização Coleção Número de chamada Status Data de devolução Código de barras
Analítica Analítica Colección general INVES-ET P01 E58 (Percorrer estante) Disponível BVE03327559

Sum. (En); 4 tab.

The catching capacity of the New Zealand fishing industry has grown rapidly since the mid-1960s. New Zealand's declaration of its exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in 1978 forced resource managers in the country to parcel out the fisheries resources among competing claimants: the domestic, joint-venture, and foreign fleets. Export incentives applied by the New Zealand government to the operations of the joint-venture companies dominated their performance results and were highly discriminatory. The policiy changes to the basis of the application of these incentives altered results significantly and were well directed. The licenced foreign fleet's operations contribute more in direct benefits than do joint ventures, but the comparison is exceedingly sensitive to the institutional framework that governs the operations of the joint ventures. The research is still in progress

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