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Coffee paradox : Global markets, commodity trade and the elusive promise of development

por Daviron, Benoit; Ponte, Stefano.
Tipo de material: materialTypeLabelLivroEditora: New York, USA: Zeed Books, 2005Descrição: 295 p.ISBN: 1842774565.Assunto(s): CAFÉ | COFFEE | CAFÉ | ANÁLISIS ECONÓMICO | ECONOMIC ANALYSIS | ANALYSE ÉCONOMIQUE | CERTIFICACIÓN | CERTIFICATION | CERTIFICATION | PRODUCTOS AGRÍCOLAS | AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS | PRODUIT AGRICOLE | MERCADOS MUNDIALES | WORLD MARKETS | MARCHÉ MONDIAL | CADENA DE ABASTECIMIENTO | SUPPLY CHAIN | CHAÎNE D'APPROVISIONNEMENT | REGULACIONES DEL MERCADO | MARKET REGULATIONS | RÉGLEMENTATION DES MARCHÉS | PRODUCCIÓN | PRODUCTION | PRODUCTION | AGRICULTURA SOSTENIBLE | SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE | AGRICULTURE DURABLE | DATOS ESTADÍSTICOS | STATISTICAL DATA | DONNÉE STATISTIQUEResumo: This book is a major analytical contribution to understanding commodity production and trade, as well as putting forward policy-relevant suggestions for 'solving' the commodity problem. Through the study of the global value chain for coffee, the authors recast the 'development problem' for countries relying on commodity exports in entirely new ways. They do so by analysing the so-called coffee paradox - the coexistence of a 'coffee boom' in consuming countries and of a 'coffee crisis' in producing countries. New consumption patterns have emerged with the growing importance of specialty, fair trade and other 'sustainable' coffees. In consuming countries, coffee has become a fashionable drink and coffee bar chains have expanded rapidly. At the same time, international coffee prices have fallen dramatically and producers receive the lowest prices in decades. This book shows that the coffee paradox exists because what farmers sell and what consumers buy are becoming increasingly 'different' coffees. It is not material quality that contemporary coffee consumers pay for, but mostly symbolic quality and in-person services. As long as coffee farmers and their organizations do not control at least parts of this 'immaterial' production, they will keep receiving low prices. The Coffee Paradox seeks ways out from this situation by addressing some key questions: What kinds of quality attributes are combined in a coffee cup or coffee package? Who is producing these attributes? How can part of these attributes be produced by developing country farmers? To what extent are specialty and sustainable coffees achieving these
Tipo de material Localização Coleção Número de chamada Status Data de devolução Código de barras
Documento impreso Documento impreso Estantería Colección general E16 19 (Percorrer estante) Disponível BVE17079127

This book is a major analytical contribution to understanding commodity production and trade, as well as putting forward policy-relevant suggestions for 'solving' the commodity problem. Through the study of the global value chain for coffee, the authors recast the 'development problem' for countries relying on commodity exports in entirely new ways. They do so by analysing the so-called coffee paradox - the coexistence of a 'coffee boom' in consuming countries and of a 'coffee crisis' in producing countries. New consumption patterns have emerged with the growing importance of specialty, fair trade and other 'sustainable' coffees. In consuming countries, coffee has become a fashionable drink and coffee bar chains have expanded rapidly. At the same time, international coffee prices have fallen dramatically and producers receive the lowest prices in decades. This book shows that the coffee paradox exists because what farmers sell and what consumers buy are becoming increasingly 'different' coffees. It is not material quality that contemporary coffee consumers pay for, but mostly symbolic quality and in-person services. As long as coffee farmers and their organizations do not control at least parts of this 'immaterial' production, they will keep receiving low prices. The Coffee Paradox seeks ways out from this situation by addressing some key questions: What kinds of quality attributes are combined in a coffee cup or coffee package? Who is producing these attributes? How can part of these attributes be produced by developing country farmers? To what extent are specialty and sustainable coffees achieving these

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