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Potential entry of Chile into NAFTA: lessons from U.S./Mexican fruit and vegetable trade Comercio e integración en las Américas

By: Stanton, J | IICA, San José (Costa Rica) | Universidad de Costa Rica, San José (Costa Rica) | BID, Washington, D.C. (EUA) | INTAL, Buenos Aires (Argentina) | Coloquio Académico de las Américas San José (Costa Rica) Mar 1998.
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: San José (Costa Rica) AGROAMERICA 2000Description: p. 87-97.ISBN: 92-9039-441-2.Subject(s): CHILE | MEXICO | NAFTA | EUA | ACUERDOS COMERCIALES | FRUTAS | LIBERALIZACION DEL INTERCAMBIO | COMERCIO INTERNACIONAL | IMPORTACIONES | | | | | | | | | | CHILI | MEXIQUE | ALENA | ETATS-UNIS | ACCORD COMMERCIAL | FRUITS | LIBERALISATION DES ECHANGES | COMMERCE INTERNATIONAL | IMPORTATIONSummary: Two signifcant agreements were forged at the 1994 Summit of the Americas. In the broader one, the presidents of nearly all Western Hemispheric nations agreed to begin efforts to construct a Free Trade Areas of the Americas FTAA, by the year 2005, with comprehensive trade and investment elements. In the more focused agreement, the NAFTA partners (the U.S. Canada, and Mexico) agreed to invite Chile to negotiate its entry. Both agreements imply the opening of U.S. borders to additional trade, a prospect not welcomed by many U.S. horticultural producers. Indeed U.S. trade with Mexico in fruits and vegetables has followed a somewhat bumpy road since NAFTA's implementation, leading in some cases to official disputes. (MV)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Serie Serie Sede Central
Colección IICA IICA-E71 67 (Browse shelf) Available BVE2693410809

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Two signifcant agreements were forged at the 1994 Summit of the Americas. In the broader one, the presidents of nearly all Western Hemispheric nations agreed to begin efforts to construct a Free Trade Areas of the Americas FTAA, by the year 2005, with comprehensive trade and investment elements. In the more focused agreement, the NAFTA partners (the U.S. Canada, and Mexico) agreed to invite Chile to negotiate its entry. Both agreements imply the opening of U.S. borders to additional trade, a prospect not welcomed by many U.S. horticultural producers. Indeed U.S. trade with Mexico in fruits and vegetables has followed a somewhat bumpy road since NAFTA's implementation, leading in some cases to official disputes. (MV)

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