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The environment and emerging development issues: Proceedings

por Dasgupta, P; Mãler, K.G; Banco Mundial, Washington, D.C. (EUA); World Bank Annual Conference on Development Economics Washington, D.C. (EUA) 26-27 Abr 1990.
Tipo de material: materialTypeLabelLivroNúmero de Chamada: E10 B213p 1990 GTZ-365 Série: Proceeding of the World Bank Annual Conference on Development Economics (Banco Mundial). Lugar de publicação: Washington, D.C. (EUA): 1990Descrição: p. 101-151.Resumo: Development economics for the most part has failed to recognize renewable environmental resources as economic goods. Yet the lives of the poor in developing countries are intimately tied to the fate of their local common-property resources-soil, fuelwood, water, and so on. Ignoring the loss of common-property renewable resources (via degradation, centralization, or privatization) in calculations of net national product can mask the destruction of resources available to a country's poor behind the false appearance of a growing national economy. This paper describes the difference between the problem of managing local common-property resources in developing countries and the problem of protecting the global commons such as the atmosphere and oceans. It outlines the calculations that would include the local commons in the national income accounting of capital assets and argues that the interests of those most dependent on the increasingly scarce local commons will be best served by placing control in their hands, while the central government provides infraestructure and educational support. To control the pollution of the global commons, on the other hand, the paper sketches a plan in which most countries would a high incentive to participate-a global allocation of limited, tradable permits to discharge defined pollutantsAssunto(s): DESARROLLO ECONOMICO SOSTENIBLE | RECURSOS NATURALES | POBLACION | DESARROLLO ECONOMICO | POLITICA AMBIENTAL | ADMINISTRACION DE RECURSOS | PRODUCTO NACIONAL NETO | EFECTOS DEL MEDIO AMBIENTE | POBREZA | PRECIOS | MERCADOS | PROTECCION AMBIENTAL | PROPIEDAD | MODELOS ECONOMICOS | ECONOMIA | DESARROLLO RURAL | PARTICIPACION DE LA MUJER | RENTA | ECONOMIA DE LOS RRNN | ECONOMIA CON CONSIDERACION DE LOS RRNN | PAISES EN DESARROLLO
Tipo de material Localização Coleção Número de chamada Status Data de devolução Código de barras
Analítica Analítica Colección general E10 B213p 1990 (Percorrer estante) Disponível BVE24067006037

Documento comentado por Munasinghe, M. y Whalley, J.; 77 ref.

Supplement to the World Bank Economic Review and the World Bank Research Observer

Development economics for the most part has failed to recognize renewable environmental resources as economic goods. Yet the lives of the poor in developing countries are intimately tied to the fate of their local common-property resources-soil, fuelwood, water, and so on. Ignoring the loss of common-property renewable resources (via degradation, centralization, or privatization) in calculations of net national product can mask the destruction of resources available to a country's poor behind the false appearance of a growing national economy. This paper describes the difference between the problem of managing local common-property resources in developing countries and the problem of protecting the global commons such as the atmosphere and oceans. It outlines the calculations that would include the local commons in the national income accounting of capital assets and argues that the interests of those most dependent on the increasingly scarce local commons will be best served by placing control in their hands, while the central government provides infraestructure and educational support. To control the pollution of the global commons, on the other hand, the paper sketches a plan in which most countries would a high incentive to participate-a global allocation of limited, tradable permits to discharge defined pollutants

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